Friday, July 27, 2012

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Faculty Development Grant

This program provides funding to support nuclear science, engineering, and related disciplines to develop a workforce capable of supporting the design, construction, operation, and regulation of nuclear facilities and the safe handling of nuclear materials. This announcement is for faculty development grants. The objectives of the Faculty Development Program are to attract and retain highly-qualified individuals in academic teaching careers. The grants specifically target probationary, tenure-track faculty during the first 6 years of their career and new faculty hires in the following academic areas: Nuclear Engineering, Health Physics, Radiochemistry, Probability Risk Assessment (Levels 2 & 3) and related disciplines. Grants may include support for developing applications for research and amounts for initiating or continuing research projects in their areas of expertise. Other areas might include course development, equipment, stipends, participation in professional society meetings, and preparation of papers, travel, and associated expenses. The NRC may increase funds to the extent that a portion of the award is matched by the institution. The program provides support to enable newer faculty to enhance their careers as professors and researchers in the university department where employed. The research supported by this announcement is intended to benefit the nuclear sector broadly.

Amount: $450,000

Date due: October 5, 2012

For more information, click here.

Friday, July 20, 2012

Advancing Informal STEM Learning (NSF)

The Advancing Informal STEM Learning (AISL) solicitation invites investigators to propose ideas, concepts, models,and other opportunities for learning and learning environments that will capture the creative and innovative potential of informal STEM learning for the future, and potentially forge new connections across all STEM learning communities.  

Leveraging new and emerging technologies, STEM learning can now be located and situated wherever the learner is and customized to meet the learner's educational needs. New interdisciplinary collaborations and partnerships for informal
learning among academia, industry, and government can greatly advance our nation's goals to produce a scientifically and technologically literate population and workforce.

Amount: Varies

Date due: January 14, 2013

For more information, click here.

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Transforming Undergraduate Education in STEM (NSF)

The Transforming Undergraduate Education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (TUES) program seeks to improve the quality of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education for all undergraduate students. This solicitation especially encourages projects that have the potential to transform undergraduate STEM education, for example, by bringing about widespread adoption of classroom practices that embody understanding of how students learn most effectively. Thus transferability and dissemination are critical aspects for projects developing instructional materials and methods and should be considered throughout the project's lifetime.?? More advanced projects should involve efforts to facilitate adaptation at other sites.The program supports efforts to create, adapt, and disseminate new learning materials and teaching strategies to reflect advances both in STEM disciplines and in what is known about teaching and learning.?? It funds projects that develop faculty expertise, implement educational innovations, assess learning and evaluate innovations, prepare K-12 teachers, or conduct research on STEM teaching and learning. It also supports projects that further the work of the program itself, for example, synthesis and dissemination of findings across the program. The program supports projects representing different stages of development, ranging from small, exploratory investigations to large, comprehensive projects. 
Amount: Varies
Date due: January 15, 2013
For more information, click here.